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Have You Heard of Retinal Microaneurysms?

Many people are familiar with the term “aneurysm,” which refers to when part of an artery wall weakens to the point that it widens abnormally. Most commonly, aneurysms occur in the major artery that leads from the heart or in the brain.

So what are retinal microaneurysms, which occur in the eye? Our eye doctor in Copperas Cove, , and , Texas, explains this generally unfamiliar term.

Definition

Microaneurysms are tiny outpouchings of blood that protrude from an artery or vein. When they occur in the eye, they are known as retinal microaneurysms. If these protrusions open, they leak blood into the tissues of the retina.

Causes

Any type of vascular disease or hypertension can contribute to the development of a retinal microaneurysm, however they have been firmly associated with diabetes. As the first clinically evident sign of diabetic retinopathy, they are regarded as the hallmark of this eye disease.

Symptoms & Diagnosis

Typically, retinal microaneurysms do not cause any noticeable symptoms. That’s why if you have diabetes, it’s essential to book regular dilated eye exams with an eye doctor at one of our Cove Eyecare clinics in Copperas Cove, , and , Texas.

Our eye doctor can detect the microaneurysm during a diabetes eye exam, and further imaging can be done to determine the origin and severity. Diagnosis is critical, because the recognition of microaneurysms is the first step towards preventing the progression of diabetic retinopathy to a stage that causes vision loss.

Treatment

There is no treatment that specifically targets a microaneurysm. Rather, the treatment targets the diabetes that’s behind the condition.

By tightening blood glucose control in your diabetes management, as well as treating any associated other health disorders such as high blood pressure, most microaneurysms are reversible. Adopting a healthy lifestyle and following your doctor’s recommendations for managing diabetes and blood pressure go far towards reducing retinal microaneurysms.

Protect your eyes against diabetic retinopathy with regular diabetes eye exams

Our eye doctors in Copperas Cove, , and , Texas, perform comprehensive, dilated eye exams to inspect for the signs of eye disease associated with diabetes.

At Cove Eyecare, we put your family’s needs first. Talk to us about how we can help you maintain healthy vision. Call us today: 254-549-1142 or book an appointment online to see one of our Copperas Cove eye doctors.

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How Does High Blood Pressure Affect Your Eyes?

Hypertension can damage vision, and your eye doctor can spot the signs even before you do

Many people don’t realize that in addition to heart disease and kidney problems, high blood pressure (hypertension) is a risk factor for many dangerous health complications. Typically, hypertension is a chronic condition that causes harm gradually.

How does it damage vision? Our Copperas Cove, Texas, explains that in your eyes, high blood pressure commonly affects the tiny, delicate blood vessels that nourish your eye with blood. When these retinal blood vessels get damaged, you will have trouble focusing. This eye disease is called hypertensive retinopathy, and it can be sight-threatening if hypertension is left untreated.

Symptoms of hypertensive retinopathy

Usually, you won’t notice any symptoms if you have mild or moderate hypertensive retinopathy. You’ll only know you have it as a result of a comprehensive eye exam by your eye doctor. However, if your high blood pressure is more severe, you may experience headaches and problems with your vision.

Diagnosing hypertensive retinopathy

When our Copperas Cove eye doctor performs a dilated eye exam, he or she will use an ophthalmoscope, a device that projects light to inspect the back of your eye, to check for the signs of retinopathy. These signs include:

  • Spots on the retina (called cotton wool spots and exudates)
  • Narrowing of blood vessels
  • Macular swelling and inflammation of the optic nerve
  • Bleeding in the back of the eye

Other ways high blood pressure can damage your eyes

In addition to retinopathy, hypertension can lead to:

  • Choroidopathy, which is a buildup of fluid under the retina. As a result of this excess fluid, you may experience blurry or distorted vision, and sometimes scarring will occur that impairs vision.
  • Optic neuropathy, which is a form of nerve damage. When the blood flow to your eye is blocked, the optic nerve can get damaged and vision loss may occur.

Treating vision damage caused by hypertension

Treatment for all of the possible eye complications of high blood pressure, especially when the conditions are detected early, is quite simple – control your blood pressure! Visit your primary physician for treatment, which may involve changing your diet, adding exercise, losing weight, and taking medication.

To preserve your long-lasting vision and protect your eyes from the risks of high blood pressure, book regular eye exams with our caring, expert eye doctor in Copperas Cove, Texas.

At Cove Eyecare, we put your family’s needs first. Talk to us about how we can help you maintain healthy vision. Call us today: 254-549-1142 or book an appointment online to see one of our Copperas Cove eye doctors.

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How You Can Help Prevent Diabetic Eye Diseases

Diabetes raises your risk of developing certain eye diseases, such as glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy, and cataracts. Many of our patients ask how long does it take for diabetes to damage eyes? Actually, diabetes can have both short-term and long-term effects on your eye health.

In the short-term, high blood sugars can cause the lens of the eye to swell, leading to temporary blurry vision. The blurriness generally goes away within a short time after blood sugar levels return to normal. But long-term uncontrolled blood sugar levels can permanently damage the small blood vessels of the eye.

However, it’s not inevitable that every individual with diabetes suffers from sight-threatening vision damage! There are steps you can take to reduce your chances of eye disease and preserve your eyesight. Our eye doctor in Copperas Cove, Texas, strongly encourages everyone with diabetes to follow these guidelines:

Visit your eye doctor for yearly eye exams

Diabetic eye diseases typically present no symptoms during the early stages. Only a comprehensive eye exam can spot the signs. What exactly is your eye doctor looking at?

At our Copperas Cove eye clinic, our eye doctor will dilate your pupils to closely inspect your optic nerve and check the tiny blood vessels of your retina. If we detect the start of eye disease, we will recommend the most suitable treatment. So the earlier the disease is noticed, the earlier you will begin to benefit from sight-saving treatments!

Maintain healthy blood sugar levels

Controlling your blood sugar within the parameters recommended by your physician goes far towards preventing eye disease and vision loss. Tight blood glucose control is the key towards having sharp, healthy sight for as long as possible with diabetes.

Keep an eye on blood pressure and cholesterol levels

In addition to normal blood sugars, it’s essential to watch your blood pressure and cholesterol levels too. Both hypertension and high cholesterol increase your risk of eye disease and a range of other health problems. A good blood pressure goal for people with diabetes is under 140/90; if your doctor has prescribed medication to help control blood pressure, it’s important to be vigilant about taking it.

Don’t smoke

If you’re a smoker, it’s high time to quit! Smoking raises your risk of diabetic retinopathy and other eye diseases associated with diabetes.

Exercise regularly

Exercise keeps your body and your eyes in good shape. It is also an effective way to help control your diabetes. However, our Copperas Cove eye doctor cautions patients who already have eye problems to avoid exercises that can strain the blood vessels in your eyes, such as weight lifting or very high-impact activities.

At Cove Eyecare, we put your family’s needs first. Talk to us about how we can help you maintain healthy vision. Call us today: 254-549-1142 or book an appointment online to see one of our Copperas Cove eye doctors.

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Can Diabetic Retinopathy Be Reversed?

Evidence shows you can reverse diabetic complications with strict diabetes control and a healthy lifestyle

It’s long been known that diabetic complications, such as diabetic retinopathy, can be slowed by taking severe control of blood sugar levels and making healthy lifestyle changes. However, there’s also evidence to suggest that complications can actually be reversed. It appears that as long as the right conditions are met, the body can heal some of the damage.

If you have diabetes, we recommend regular visits to our eye care practice in Copperas Cove, Texas, for an eye exam to inspect for diabetic retinopathy and other types of diabetic eye disease. Remember, when caught early, diabetic eye disease is treatable!

Eye exams and diabetic retinopathy

Diabetic retinopathy is a typical complication of diabetes, in which abnormally high blood sugar levels lead to retinal damage, vision loss or blindness.

If we detect the early signs of diabetic retinopathy during your comprehensive eye exam at Cove Eyecare, you can start making lifestyle changes immediately, such as tighter blood glucose management, exercise and a healthy diet, to prevent the disease from progressing. By visiting for regular dilated eye exams, our eye doctor can monitor your symptoms and work with you to design a modern treatment plan to slow or reverse vision loss.

The effects of diet on diabetic retinopathy

The most famous diet-based therapy for reversing serious chronic disease is credited to Dr. Walter Kempner, physician of the ophthalmology department at Duke University, who pioneered the approach with his recommendations for eating mostly rice and fruit. Kempner’s diet was plant-based and ultra-low in sodium, fat, cholesterol and protein.

Kempner conducted a patient study in which he took “eyegrounds photographs”, which captured a view of the back of the eye. By tracking changes in these images, he demonstrated that diet could actually reverse damage. In fact, he found some patients who had suffered extreme vision loss due to diabetic retinopathy were later able to read fine print again. Of the 44 patients in his study who had diabetic retinopathy, 30% of them saw improvement in their vision.

Nowadays, we have many advanced laser therapies and injections to treat diabetic retinopathy. While Kempner’s food plan is not recommended as a stand-alone approach, it does show that what you eat can be very powerful for preserving your eye health!

What you can do to slow the progression of diabetic retinopathy

According to the American Optometric Association, there are several ways you can slow or possibly reverse the progression of diabetic retinopathy:

  • Manage blood sugar levels as tightly as possible
  • Take any prescription medications according to your doctor’s recommendations
  • Eat a healthy diet
  • Exercise regularly
  • Control hypertension
  • Don’t smoke and avoid alcohol
  • Don’t miss routine eye exams that enable your eye doctor to monitor your condition and change treatment, as necessary.

To schedule a diabetes eye exam with a qualified, experienced eye doctor, contact our Copperas Cove, Texas, eye care practice.

At Cove Eyecare, we put your family’s needs first. Talk to us about how we can help you maintain healthy vision. Call us today: 254-549-1142 or book an appointment online to see one of our Copperas Cove eye doctors.

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Does Obesity Impact Eye Health?

Nation-wide awareness about the vast dangers of obesity is at an all-time high, with TV shows like “The Biggest Loser” and health initiatives such as Michelle Obama’s “Let’s Move!” campaign shining a spotlight on the importance of fitness and good nutrition. However, despite the public’s knowledge of obesity’s effects on hypertension, stroke, and diabetes, many are not aware of how it damages eye health and vision.

Increasing evidence shows that people who are clinically obese have an elevated risk of developing serious eye diseases. It is widely known that expanding waistlines place people at a higher risk of getting diabetes, heart disease, and cancer — but researchers say the link between obesity and deteriorating vision is the “risk factor that no one talks about”. Professor Michael Belkin and Dr. Zohar Habot-Wilner, from the Goldschleger Eye Institute at the Sheba Medical Center, found a consistently strong correlation between obesity and the development of four major eye diseases that may cause blindness:

  • Age-related macular degeneration (AMD)
  • Cataracts
  • Glaucoma
  • Diabetic retinopathy

The researchers said that although the evidence was out there suggesting a link between obesity and these conditions, their study emphasizes the optometric risks of obesity which can help motivate people to shed those extra pounds.

How Obesity Contributes to Eye Disease

A Body Mass Index (BMI) of 25 is considered overweight and above 30 is regarded as obese. A high BMI is tied to several chronic systemic health conditions such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and stroke, among others. Recent research indicates that a handful of ocular diseases can now be added to that list.

Serious eye conditions such as diabetic retinopathy, glaucoma, and age-related macular degeneration are more common in individuals with obesity, as well as floppy eyelid syndrome, retinal vein occlusions, thyroid-related eye diseases, and stroke-related vision loss.

The connection between obesity and these eye diseases is likely due to the increased risk of peripheral artery disease. This occurs when the tiny blood vessels bringing oxygen to parts of your body like the feet, kidneys, and eyes become compromised.

Your eyes are particularly prone to damage from obesity because the blood vessels in the eyes (called arterioles) are easily blocked, since they’re extremely thin and small — as thin as ½ the width of a human hair!

Most people are not aware that obesity may increase the rate of developing cataracts, too. Cataracts result when the focusing lens in the eye becomes cloudy and requires surgery to be replaced. In addition to age, cataract development is associated with obesity, poor nutrition, gout, diabetes and high blood sugar levels, though the exact cause isn’t clear.

A Healthy Lifestyle Can Reduce Your Risk of Ocular Disease

Knowing about the risk of vision loss may give those with a high BMI the extra motivational boost they need to lose weight. The good news is that a few lifestyle changes can reduce the associated risks.

An active lifestyle and a balanced, nutritious diet lower obesity and improve overall physical and eye health. Give your body a boost by incorporating important nutrients, such as vitamins C and E, zeaxanthin, omega 3, zinc, and lutein, many of which are found in green leafy and dark orange vegetables, as they have been shown to reduce the onset, progression, and severity of certain eye diseases.

We Can Help Keep Your Eyes Healthy in Copperas Cove

While a healthy diet and regular exercise greatly increase your chances of living a disease-free long life, they alone are not enough to ensure long term healthy eyesight. Regular eye exams with Dr. Micheline Young can help prevent or detect the onset of ocular disease, and maintain vision that is clear and comfortable.

If you have any questions or concerns regarding your vision or eye health, don’t hesitate to call Cove Eyecare — we’re here for you.

3 Ways Diabetes Can Affect Your Vision and Eyes

Did you know that people with diabetes are 20 times more likely to get eye diseases than those without it? There are three major eye conditions that diabetics are at risk for developing: cataracts, glaucoma, and diabetic retinopathy. To prevent these sight-threatening diseases, it’s important to control your blood sugar level and have your eyes checked at least once a year by an eye doctor.

But First, What Is Diabetes?

Diabetes is a disease that is associated with high blood glucose levels. Insulin, a hormone produced by the pancreas, helps our cells get energy from the sugars we eat. Diabetes develops when the body doesn’t produce or respond to insulin effectively, leaving too much sugar in the blood stream instead. Over time, diabetes can lead to potentially irreversible ocular damage and poor eyesight. However, by taking care of your blood sugar levels and your eyes, you can prevent vision loss.

Annual eye exams are recommended for everyone, but routine screenings are even more important for diabetics. Eye doctors may send diabetic eye health reports to a patient’s primary care physician or internist to adjust medication as needed to prevent complications.

What’s the Link Between Vision and Diabetes?

Blurred vision or fluctuating eyesight clarity is often one of the first noticeable signs that diabetes has begun to affect your eyes. Sometimes, fluid leaking into the eye causes the lens to swell and change shape. This, in turn, makes it difficult for the eyes to focus, resulting in fuzzy vision. Such symptoms can indicate that an eye disease is developing, or may simply be due to imbalanced blood sugar levels which can be rectified by getting your blood sugar back to healthy levels.

If you start to notice blurry vision, make an appointment with Dr. Micheline Young as soon as possible.

The 3 Ways Diabetes Impacts Vision

Cataracts

While cataracts are extremely common and a part of the natural aging process, those with diabetes tend to develop cataracts earlier in life. Characterized by a clouding or fogging of the lens within the eye, cataracts impede light from entering the eye, causing blurred vision and glares. The best treatment is cataract surgery, which is very safe and effective.

Glaucoma

Glaucoma refers to a group of eye diseases characterized by optic nerve damage. Since it tends to impact peripheral vision first, glaucoma often goes unnoticed until significant damage has occurred. However, routine glaucoma screenings can detect warning signs; early treatment can prevent disease progression and vision loss.

Although there is no true cure for glaucoma, most glaucoma patients successfully manage it with special eye drops, medication, and on occasion, laser treatment or other surgery. The earlier glaucoma is diagnosed and managed, the better the outcome.

Diabetic Retinopathy

Diabetic retinopathy occurs when the small blood vessels on your retina (capillaries) become weakened and then balloon (microaneurysm) due to poorly controlled blood sugar levels. The resulting poor blood circulation in the back of the eye causes more abnormal blood vessels to grow, which also bleed or leak fluid, and can lead to scar tissue, retinal detachment and even blindness, over time.

Often there are no symptoms until the advanced stages of diabetic retinopathy, where patients may begin to see spots and missing patches in their vision. Retinopathy can be treated through surgery and eye injections, but the best way to prevent this disease from progressing is to regularly have your eyes screened.

The good news is that diabetic eye disease can often be prevented with early detection, proper management of your diabetes and regular diabetic eye exams. Contact Cove Eyecare in Copperas Cove to set up your eye doctor’s appointment today.

Diabetic Eye Exams with Dilation

See why people with diabetes need yearly eye exams

If you have diabetes of any type, your body cannot produce, use, or store glucose properly. As a result, the level of glucose in your bloodstream can rise to high levels. Eventually, elevated blood sugar levels can lead to various health problems, such as diabetic eye disease. That’s why yearly diabetic eye exams are essential! Book an appointment with our eye doctor in Copperas Cove, Texas, for a specialized, dilated eye exam.

What eye diseases do diabetic eye exams check for?

Several ocular conditions, such as diabetic retinopathy, glaucoma, and cataracts can develop without causing any symptoms. Only a dilated eye exam can identify the early signs of these diseases.

Why are yearly eye exams so important?

If you are visiting our Copperas Cove, Texas, eye doctor for annual eye exams, we’ll be able to spot any changes immediately. The moment we spot any early indications of a problem, we can treat it. Early detection = early treatment, which can make the difference between lasting vision and vision loss.

What is a dilated eye exam?

To perform this specialized eye exam, your eye doctor will apply dilating eye drops to enlarge your pupils. Wider pupils provide a wider view of the retina, which makes it easier to see any abnormalities. For example, if you have retinopathy at a very early stage, your eye doctor will be able to see the very first evidence of leakage.

Vision loss from diabetes isn’t inevitable, and yearly diabetic eye exams with dilation can make the difference! Don’t procrastinate – schedule your eye exam at Cove Eyecare

in Copperas Cove, Texas, as soon as possible to preserve your lasting, quality vision with diabetes.

At Cove Eyecare, we put your family’s needs first. Talk to us about how we can help you maintain healthy vision. Call us today: 254-549-1142 or book an appointment online to see one of our Copperas Cove eye doctors.

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Diabetes and Your Eyes

Diabetes is becoming much more prevalent around the globe. According to the International Diabetes Federation, approximately 425 million adults were living with diabetes in the year 2017 and 352 million more people were at risk of developing type 2 diabetes. By 2045 the number of people diagnosed is expected to rise to 629 million.

Diabetes is a leading cause of blindness as well as heart attacks, stroke, kidney failure, neuropathy (nerve damage) and lower limb amputation. In fact, in 2017, diabetes was implicated in 4 million deaths worldwide. Nevertheless preventing these complications from diabetes is possible with proper treatment, medication and regular medical screenings as well as improving your diet, physical activity and adopting a healthy lifestyle.

What is Diabetes?

Diabetes is a chronic disease in which the hormone insulin is either underproduced or ineffective in its ability to regulate blood sugar. Uncontrolled diabetes leads to hyperglycemia, or high blood sugar, which damages many systems in the body such as the blood vessels and the nervous system.

How Does Diabetes Affect The Eyes?

Diabetic eye disease is a group of conditions which are caused, or worsened, by diabetes; including: diabetic retinopathy, diabetic macular edema, glaucoma and cataracts. Diabetes increases the risk of cataracts by four times, and can increase dryness and reduce cornea sensation.

In diabetic retinopathy, over time, the tiny blood vessels within the eyes become damaged, causing leakage, poor oxygen circulation, then scarring of the sensitive tissue within the retina, which can result in further cell damage and scarring.

The longer you have diabetes, and the longer your blood sugar levels remain uncontrolled, the higher the chances of developing diabetic eye disease. Unlike many other vision-threatening conditions which are more prevalent in older individuals, diabetic eye disease is one of the main causes of vision loss in the younger, working-age population. Unfortunately, these eye conditions can lead to blindness if not caught early and treated. In fact, 2.6% of blindness worldwide is due to diabetes.

Diabetic Retinopathy

As mentioned above, diabetes can result in cumulative damage to the blood vessels in the retina, the light-sensitive tissue located at the back of the eye. This is called diabetic retinopathy.

The retina is responsible for converting the light it receives into visual signals to the optic nerve in the brain. High blood sugar levels can cause the blood vessels in the retina to leak or hemorrhage, causing bleeding and distorting vision. In advanced stages, new blood vessels may begin to grow on the retinal surface causing scarring and further damaging cells in the retina. Diabetic retinopathy can eventually lead to blindness.

Signs and Symptoms of Diabetic Retinopathy

The early stages of diabetic retinopathy often have no symptoms, which is why it’s vitally important to have frequent diabetic eye exams. As it progresses you may start to notice the following symptoms:

  • Blurred or fluctuating vision or vision loss
  • Floaters (dark spots or strings that appear to float in your visual field)
  • Blind spots
  • Color vision loss

There is no pain associated with diabetic retinopathy to signal any issues. If not controlled, as retinopathy continues it can cause retinal detachment and macular edema, two other serious conditions that threaten vision. Again, there are often NO signs or symptoms until more advanced stages.

A person with diabetes can do their part to control their blood sugar level. Following the physician’s medication plan, as well as diet and exercise recommendations can help slow the progression of diabetic retinopathy.

Retinal Detachment

Scar tissues caused by the breaking and forming of blood vessels in advanced retinopathy can lead to a retinal detachment in which the retina pulls away from the underlying tissue. This condition is a medical emergency and must be treated immediately as it can lead to permanent vision loss. Signs of a retinal detachment include a sudden onset of floaters or flashes in the vision.

Diabetic Macular Edema (DME)

Diabetic macular edema occurs when the macula, a part of the retina responsible for clear central vision, becomes full of fluid (edema). It is a complication of diabetic retinopathy that occurs in about half of patients, and causes vision loss.

Treatment for Diabetic Retinopathy and Diabetic Macular Edema

While vision loss from diabetic retinopathy and DME often can’t be restored, with early detection there are some preventative treatments available. Proliferative diabetic retinopathy (when the blood vessels begin to grow abnormally) can be treated by laser surgery, injections or a procedure called vitrectomy in which the vitreous gel in the center of the eye is removed and replaced. This will treat bleeding caused by ruptured blood vessels. DME can be treated with injection therapy, laser surgery or corticosteroids.

Prevent Vision Loss from Diabetes

The best way to prevent vision loss from diabetic eye disease is early detection and treatment. Since there may be no symptoms in the early stages, regular diabetic eye exams are critical for early diagnosis. In fact diabetics are now sometimes monitored by their health insurance to see if they are getting regular eye exams and premium rates can be affected by how regularly the patients get their eyes checked. Keeping diabetes under control through exercise, diet, medication and regular screenings will help to reduce the chances of vision loss and blindness from diabetes.

 

November is Diabetes Awareness Month

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Diabetes is a growing health crisis in North America as an estimated 29 million Americans and 3.4 million Canadians are currently living with the disease. Chances are it affects you or someone you know. November has been dedicated as a time to spread awareness about the disease, its risk factors and the effects it has on your body, your daily life and the lives of your loved ones.

Diabetes and Your Eyes

Diabetes is a systemic disease that causes fluctuations in glucose (blood sugar) levels which can affect blood vessels throughout the body including those in your eyes and visual system. People with diabetes are at higher risk for blindness than the general population, however with regular eye exams and proper care, most of the complications are minor and treatable.

Minor changes in glucose levels could result in complications such as blurred or double vision, floaters or even visual field loss. These conditions are usually quite treatable. Diabetics are also at greater risk for developing eye diseases such as glaucoma (40% increase risk) and cataracts (60% increased risk). With early detection, both of these conditions can be treated and the majority of vision restored.

Diabetic eye disease often has NO noticeable symptoms or pain, so comprehensive eye exams that include dilating the pupils are essential to detect signs of diabetes. Online vision assessments will not detect diabetic eye disease.

The condition that is the most concerning risk of diabetes is called diabetic retinopathy which can lead to blindness if not diagnosed and treated.

What You Need to Know About Diabetic Retinopathy

Diabetic retinopathy occurs when the tiny blood vessels or capillaries in the back of the eye develop weakened vessel walls. If not treated, the vessels leak fluid and become blocked. This can progress to hemorrhages in the retina, and over time the eye does not receive enough oxygen and nutrients. As a result, new fine blood vessels start to grow. These proliferating vessels leak and can cause further bleeding, scarring and potentially lead to blindness. A special zone in the central retina called the macula is especially susceptible to diabetes. Diabetic macular edema (when fluid seeps into the macula) can cause permanent vision loss if not promptly detected.

There are treatments for stopping the progression of the disease such as laser therapy or intraocular injections, although once damage to vision has occurred, it is often permanent. This is why the condition must be diagnosed and treated early on.

All diabetics should have a regular comprehensive eye exam to catch any early signs of diabetic retinopathy or other vision threatening conditions. Because risk factors vary, speak to your eye doctor about how often you should have an exam. Risk factors for diabetic retinopathy include:

  • Length of time living with diabetes
  • Uncontrolled blood sugar levels
  • High blood pressure
  • Smoking
  • Alcohol consumption
  • Pregnancy
  • Genetics

Although blindness from diabetes is preventable it is still a leading cause of blindness among working-age adults. If you or someone you know has the disease, make sure that proper eye care is a priority.